FACTORS INFLUENCING MONITORING OF FOOD SECURITY PROJECTS IN CENTRAL SOMALIA: THE CASE OF INTERNATIONAL RESCUE COMMITTEE (IRC) IN SOUTH MUDUG REGION.
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After twenty years of conflict, Somalia has been classified as the world’s most fragile state. The causes of conflict in Somalia are deep and complex. Multiple levels of armed conflict and insecurity exist. These include localized communal clashes over resources, political conflicts over control of the state, regional proxy wars, and conflicts fuelled by global agendas and ideology. These conflicts not only cause instability in Somalia, but also threaten the ability of aid organizations to effectively monitor and deliver humanitarian assistance to the needy population. Approximately half of the population is in need of assistance. The need for humanitarian organizations to ensure aid reaches those most in need by adopting strategies to deal with the enormous challenges facing them, remains a top priority. In this regard, this report examines how security, skills and capacity of aid organization personnel as well as organization stricture impact on effective monitoring of humanitarian aid. The study provides a detailed analysis of each of these parameters and provides key recommendations for improving monitoring of projects. This study was carried out in south Mudug region of central Somalia and primary focused on the International Rescue Committee’s (IRC) food security projects in south Mudug region. The study employed a descriptive survey design in order to collect adequate and relevant data for analyzing the topic under study. The primary data collection was preceded by extensive literature review of the research topic. Primary data was collected by use of questionnaires and standardized interview guides and analyzed using both qualitative and quantitative techniques. Main findings, conclusions and recommendations of the study have been presented in chapter four and five of the report. The study found out that insecurity in not a major factor influencing monitoring of food security projects I central Somalia. It was also found that capacity of national staff and strategies employed by the IRC in monitoring of its food security project are weak and need improvements .The findings of the will be found useful by the employees of the IRC and other aid organizations operating in Somalia. It will also be of significance importance to academics, practitioners in the humanitarian sector as well as the donor community.