THE INFLUENCE OF PSYCHOSOCIAL FACTORS ON HIV ANTIRETROVIRAL DRUGS ADHERENCE AMONG YOUNG PEOPLE IN NAKURU CENTRAL DISTRICT, KENYA
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HIV and AIDS has had a devastating effect on humanity since its discovery in 1984.
However gains made in research have seen improvements in managing the condition and
transformed HIV from an acute condition to a chronic illness that is manageable and
survivable. Since HIV has been present in the population for a while now, more and more
young people are living with the virus as a result of being perinatally infected or
behaviorally acquired. Such young people who are navigating through a critical part of
their life undergo numerous challenges in maintaining adherence to medication. This
study investigated the influence of psychosocial factors on adherence to treatment for
HIV among young people. The study sought to investigate the extent ARV adherence
among young people is influence by psychosocial factors; psychological factors, alcohol
and drug abuse; patient’s social environment; and the nature of health care provision. The
study utilized descriptive survey design to collect primary and secondary data from
representative sample. Structured questionnaires and oral interviews were used to collect
primary data for the study from the respondents while secondary data was obtained from
document reviews. Findings revealed a significant correlation between depression and
adherence (-0.633) implying that that YPLWHIV who are experiencing depressive
symptoms are less likely to adhere while those who are anxious are more likely to adhere.
Alcohol abuse was a major contributing factor to depression and non-adherence with a
significant correlation being established between alcohol and drug adherence (-0.664).
The finding also revealed high disclosure rate as well as high drug self-efficacy and
perception of social support which in turn positively influenced adherence. Provision of
health care meets the youth expectations at the facility. The study proposes efforts to
address depression, address alcohol and drug abuse and improve self-drug efficacy as a
way of improving adherence.
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